401K Update: Hardship Withdrawals – The IRS Issues Proposed Regulation Reflecting Statutory Changes

Go Back

This past November, the IRS issued proposed regulations to effectuate changes made for hardship withdrawals in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. Comments were due by Jan. 14, 2019. Although the statutory changes are effective beginning in 2019, the proposed regulations do not require any changes in how hardships are administered until 2020. Plan documents must be amended to reflect changes to the safe harbor rules. Most recordkeepers updated their systems so participants are no longer suspended from making contributions following a hardship distribution, but they have not set a time frame for when plan sponsors can expect to receive the necessary amendments. The deadline for amendments will be the end of the second calendar year beginning after the hardship changes appear on the IRS’ Required Amendments List. The proposed regulations include some changes that go beyond what is required to conform to the statutory changes. While the changes generally make hardship distributions more accessible, the IRS makes it clear that plan sponsors are free to add their own restrictions, such as limiting the sources eligible for hardship distributions.

Current Law

Prior to age 59½, in-service distribution of elective deferrals is limited to certain events including hardship. A distribution qualifies as a hardship only if made on account of an “immediate and heavy financial need.” The amount distributed cannot exceed the amount necessary to satisfy this need. The determination of whether the participant has “an immediate and heavy financial need” must be based on “all relevant facts and circumstances.” A distribution is considered necessary to meet “an immediate and heavy financial need” only if other resources are not available to the participant. Plan sponsors may accept a participant’s representation that he/she has no alternative resources, unless the sponsor has actual knowledge to the contrary. Certain sources are not eligible for hardship distributions – post 1988 earnings, safe harbor contributions, QNECs and QMACs.

Existing Safe Harbor Rules

Although not a legal requirement, the majority of plan sponsors follow the safe harbors. If a plan sponsor follows the safe harbor rules, the IRS will not challenge hardships on audit. These rules are included in virtually all prototype and volume submitter documents. There are two aspects to the safe harbor rules:

What Has Changed

ACR#308175 02/19

Posted on February 4, 2019 by retirementtimesnewsletter

 

Acumen Wealth Advisors, LLC® is affiliated with RPAG and utilizes their robust retirement plan consulting tools and resources to deliver enhanced value to plan sponsor clients. RPAG™, a wholly owned subsidiary of NFP (NFP Corp.), provides retirement advisors premier technology, systems, training, and resources through its practice management platforms.

Sharing is caring!